Loxley Chapel – Sheffield, UK

History:

Loxley Chapel was built in 1787 by the Rev Benjamin Greaves who was the curate of Bradfield, along with a few friends. The chapel closed in 1993 after the parish had dwindled to an unsustainable amount. When the construction of the chapel had been completed, consecration was to be refused because the builders declined to put in an east window for unknown reasons. It was later sold at auction for approximately £315 and thus became an independent chapel.  According to a religious census of 1851, an average congregation at an afternoon service was 200 and it had started performing baptisms in 1799. The first officer on-board the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was reportedly christened here.

After a great day exploring Sheffield, we decided to head to Loxley in search of a well known derelict chapel, after pulling over on the roadside we set of walking through the graves and eventually came to the building itself, from the outside the chapel was not what we expected, it was a huge imposing nearly perfectly square building that looked more like a small mansion than a chapel.  The building had a few boarded up windows and the drainage downpipes had long since broken in half, however this really added character to this building. We found the access, which was extremely easy and began to explore, once inside we were taken back in time thinking what this chapel must have looked like and the people who would of congregated here, the pews on the upper balcony were in great condition and we sat and contemplated for a while !  The old organ had seen better days but was still a very interesting and unique feature.  As the light faded and darkness fell, we found an old umbrella on the floor which looked rather old and spooky and a chain hanging from a ceiling grate.  A very enjoyable explore !! 

All images © 2013-2015

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